Volume 5, Issue 2 (May 2020)                   JNFS 2020, 5(2): 132-140 | Back to browse issues page


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Shareghfarid E, Sangsefidi Z S, Hosseinzadeh M, Salehi-Abargouei A, Mohammadi M. Comparison of Nutrients' Intakes in Children with and without Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. JNFS. 2020; 5 (2) :132-140
URL: http://jnfs.ssu.ac.ir/article-1-207-en.html
Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Shahid Sadughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran.
Abstract:   (869 Views)
Background: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common chronic mental disorder among children. Children with ADHD may be at risk for a variety of nutrients' deficiencies. We aimed to assess the nutrients' intakes among ADHD children and compare them with the healthy ones. Methods: This was a hospital-based case-control survey over 120 ADHD as the cases and 240 non-ADHD children as the control participants aged 6-13 years. Usual dietary intakes were assessed using a validated semi quantitative food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The P-values were considered significant if they were < 0·05. Results: Energy: 2812.2 ± 1029.9 kcal/day vs. 3136.4 ± 1360.3 kcal/day, P = 0.001), fat: 78.3 ± 28.8 g/day vs. 87.2 ± 44.9 g/day, P > 0.001), and carbohydrate: 436.8 ± 192.6 g/day vs. 479.9 ± 244.2 g/day, P = 0.009) intakes were significantly lower in ADHD than healthy children. Similarly, consumption of calcium: 968.5 ± 358.3 mg/day vs. 1055.7 ± 453.4 mg/day, P = 0.03) and magnesium: 363.1 ± 173.9 mg/day vs. 411.9 ± 220.8 mg/day, P = 0.01) were significantly lower in the cases than control group. However, intakes of thiamin: 34.4±18.8 mg/day vs. 40.4 ± 25.6 mg/day, P = 0.002), riboflavin: 1.99 ± 0.76 mg/day vs. 2.21 ± 0.95 mg/day, P = 0.01), niacin: 24.9 ± 10.6 mg/day vs. 27.5 ± 13.2 mg/day, P = 0.01), and vitamin B5: 6.85 ± 3.35 mg/day vs. 7.49 ± 3.84 mg/day, P = 0.02) were significantly lower in the case than control group. Conclusion: Children with ADHD consumed significantly lower quantities of energy, macronutrients, calcium, magnesium, B vitamins (B1, B2, B3, B5), and vitamin C compared with the healthy children.
 

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Type of article: orginal article | Subject: public specific
Received: 2018/09/21 | Accepted: 2019/02/20 | Published: 2020/05/1 | ePublished: 2020/05/1

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